Picture And Writing Paper

Picture And Writing Paper-69
Emergent writing is young children’s first attempts at the writing process.Children as young as 2 years old begin to imitate the act of writing by creating drawings and symbolic markings that represent their thoughts and ideas (Rowe & Neitzel 2010; Dennis & Votteler 2013).Preschoolers benefit from daily writing experiences, so it is helpful to embed writing in the daily routine, such as having children write (or attempt to write) their names at sign-in and during choice times.

Emergent writing is young children’s first attempts at the writing process.Children as young as 2 years old begin to imitate the act of writing by creating drawings and symbolic markings that represent their thoughts and ideas (Rowe & Neitzel 2010; Dennis & Votteler 2013).Preschoolers benefit from daily writing experiences, so it is helpful to embed writing in the daily routine, such as having children write (or attempt to write) their names at sign-in and during choice times.

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During early childhood, teachers are laying the foundation for generative knowledge as children learn to express themselves orally and experiment with different forms of written communication, such as composing a story, writing notes, creating lists, and taking messages.

Children can dictate words, phrases, or sentences that an adult can record on paper, or they can share ideas for group writing.

This is the beginning of a series of stages that children progress through as they learn to write (see “Stages of Emergent Writing”).

Emergent writing skills, such as the development of namewriting proficiency, are important predictors of children’s future reading and writing skills (National Center for Family & Literacy 2008; Puranik & Lonigan 2012).

Namewriting proficiency provides a foundation for other literacy knowledge and skills; it is associated with alphabet knowledge, letter writing, print concepts, and spelling (Cabell et al.

2009; Drouin & Harmon 2009; Puranik & Lonigan 2012).Researchers and educators often use the term to define a broad set of language and literacy skills focused primarily on the development and significance of emergent reading skills.To better understand writing development—and to support teachers’ work with young children—researchers have proposed a framework to explain emergent writing practices (Puranik & Lonigan 2014).Generative knowledge describes children’s abilities to write phrases and sentences that convey meaning.It is the ability to translate thoughts into writing that goes beyond the word level (Puranik & Lonigan 2014).Children benefit from teachers modeling writing and from opportunities to interact with others on writing projects.Teachers can connect writing to topics of interest, think aloud about the process of composing a message (Dennis & Votteler 2013), and explain how to plan what to write (e.g., choosing words and topics, along with the mechanics of writing, such as punctuation).Children gain knowledge of and interest in writing as they are continually exposed to print and writing in their environment.There are multiple strategies teachers can use to scaffold children’s writing, such as verbally reminding children to use writing in their classroom activities and providing appropriate writing instructions (Gerde, Bingham, & Wasik 2012).Teachers play an important role in the development of 3- to 5-year-olds’ emergent writing by encouraging children to communicate their thoughts and record their ideas (Hall et al. In some early childhood classrooms, however, emergent writing experiences are almost nonexistent.One recent study, which is in accord with earlier research, found that 4- and 5-year-olds (spread across 81 classrooms) averaged just two minutes a day either writing or being taught writing (Pelatti et al. This article shares a framework for understanding emergent writing and ties the framework to differentiating young children’s emergent writing experiences.

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